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The Naturehike Cloud Up 1 is a one-person, 3 season backpacking tent that weighs 3.4 pounds. 

For the price, it is a lightweight and decent-quality model for hitting the trails. It isn’t the lightest option on the market, but it is affordable and compact, with overwhelmingly positive user reviews. 

This review will tell you everything you need to know about the Cloud Up 1 so you can decide whether it’s the best choice for you. 

Naturehike Cloud Up 1 Tent Review

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09/02/2021 11:06 am GMT

Who Is the Cloud Up 1 For?

The Cloud Up 1 is a great entry-level tent for solo campers who want to spend more time exploring the great outdoors.

It is reasonably compact and can be trusted in a range of climates, so it’s the perfect starter tent for beginner campers or just anyone working on a tighter budget. 

This isn’t a top-of-the-range expedition tent, so you can’t expect it to hold up in extreme conditions. But for most weather and most people, the Cloud Up 1 is a perfectly respectable choice.  

Design, Material, & Performance

Before investing your hard-earned money in a new tent, you need to know whether it’s the right choice for you. 

Here’s an in-depth look at how the Naturehike Cloud Up 1 performs in the real world.

Waterproofing & Wind-Resistance

The Cloud Up 1 performs well in wet and windy weather. 

The ripstop nylon will resist tears in windy weather, and the 4000mm water-resistant rainfly will keep you dry in some of the foulest weather.

As with all tents, you will need to regularly treat your tent with a waterproof coating; otherwise, it will start to leak over time. 

The bathtub-style floor will help prevent water from seeping up from the ground, and the included rainfly will prevent your tent floor from scratching or wearing thin.

The Cloud Up performs well in the wind, too. A combination of a strong frame, low peak height, and half-dome design will keep it standing if bad weather rolls in.

Just don’t forget to pitch your tent, including the guy lines, nice and taut to give yourself the best chance of resisting nasty weather. 

Durability

Naturehike is a budget tent brand, so you can’t expect it to last as long as the expedition-quality kit. That said, Naturehike tents are of much better quality than competitors of a similar price. 

The 7001 series aluminum poles are rugged enough for most of the conditions you’re likely to face, and the tent’s 20D ripstop nylon fabric is highly tear-resistant.

That being said, I disagree that this tent is suitable for 4 seasons. Despite what Naturehike says, I would recommend this tent only as a 3 season option because I don’t think the fabric is strong enough to withstand heavy snowfall. 

Ease of Set-Up

Setting up the Cloud Up 1 is quick and straightforward. The tent features a single hub-style pole, so a solo camper can pitch the tent in minutes. 

The Cloud Up 1 also comes with a quick-clip system for attaching the tent body to the poles, so there’s no need to struggle with fiddly pole sleeves.

Comfort & Livability

While the Cloud Up 1 is a solid all-around tent, it is a bit on the cramped side. 

Although the tent has an overall floor space of about 27 square feet (2.5m), which is decent for a solo tent, the shelter’s layout isn’t designed to maximize livability.

For example, the tent has a peak height of 3’3” (99cm), which is a bit low for most campers.

Furthermore, while the Cloud Up 1 does have a vestibule for gear storage, that vestibule is quite small. You might find that you have to bring some kit into the tent, giving you less space to spread out. 

Weight & Packed Size

In terms of portability, the Naturehike Cloud Up 1 is a bit of a mixed bag. The tent is surprisingly small and portable when packed into its included stuff sack. However, at 3.5 lbs (1.6 kg), it’s pretty heavy for a solo tent.

Therefore, the Cloud Up 1 is ideal for hikers camping for a few days, but you’d probably want to invest in something lighter for any serious thru-hiking. 

The Upgrade

If you want to get a version of the Cloud 1 with an extra vent for increased airflow and reduced condensation, you can opt for the upgraded version

I think the upgrade is worth the money because a build-up of moisture can be unhygienic and uncomfortable, especially on longer trips. 

What Do Users Think & Say About This Tent?

As with most Naturehike tents, the reviews for the Cloud Up 1 are extremely positive. 

The overall sentiment about the Cloud Up 1 is that it’s a high-quality and reliable shelter for outdoor adventures.

Most campers also note that the tent is a great value for the money, though it’s a bit heavier than some of the more expensive options on the market.

The only negative thing that people have to say is that the tent is a bit cramped for the weight. This can make storing your kit a bit of a pain, and you might end up spooning your backpack if you don’t pack light. 

What I Love About the Naturehike Cloud Up 1

I love that this tent makes exploring the outdoors more affordable. It just goes to show that you don’t need to be super rich or have the most expensive kit to get out into nature. 

For the price, the quality is excellent. Also, I would trust this tent to keep me warm and dry in the wet weather.

I also love that the tent is white, so it will reflect the heat away in the summer months and prevent the sleeping compartment from overheating.

What I Don’t Like About This Tent 

The ventilation is a bit limited in this tent, with just a single vent in the sleeping compartment. I also don’t like the fact that the vestibule is so small, as it’s a lot less comfortable to sleep alongside your kit. 

I would also prefer to hike with a lighter tent than this one, but I can’t reasonably complain about the weight considering the quality of the materials and the price. 

Pros & Cons

Pros:
  • Affordable
  • Easy to pitch
  • Windproof & Waterproof
  • Strong frame 
  • Suitable for backpacking
  • Heat-reflecting color 
Cons:
  • Heavy for a one-person tent 
  • Limited ventilation 
  • Limited gear storage

Alternatives

If the Naturehike Cloud Up 1 doesn’t seem like the right tent for you, loads of other great options are available on the market right now. 

If you’re willing to spend a bit more to get a lighter and more spacious one-person tent, the MSR Hubba NX 1 might be a good choice.

MSR Hubba NX 1-Person Lightweight Backpacking Tent
$379.95
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09/02/2021 11:00 am GMT

Alternatively, the Kelty Late Start 1 is another relatively budget-friendly option for solo campers that offers more livability and comfort.

Kelty Late Start 1 Person Backpacking Tent
$104.96
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09/02/2021 10:53 am GMT

Final Thoughts

At the end of the day, the Naturehike Cloud Up 1 is a solid solo tent for campers who value weather resistance, convenience, affordability, and durability above all else.

It might not be the lightest or most spacious option, but it’s a great choice for most 3 season outdoor adventures.

I hope you found this tent review of the Naturehike Cloud Up 1 useful, and I wish you many happy camping adventures! 

Naturehike Cloud-Up 1 Person Tent
$119.00
CHECK ON AMAZON
We earn a commission if you click this link and make a purchase at no additional cost to you.
09/02/2021 11:06 am GMT

FAQs

Are Naturehike Tents Any Good?

Naturehike tents are extremely popular. While Naturehike gear isn’t designed for use in the most extreme weather conditions, the kit is reasonably good quality and a great value. 

Where Are Naturehike Tents Made?

The vast majority of Naturehike’s tents are designed and produced in China.

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Gaby - Writer for The Camper Lifestyle

Gaby

Gaby is a professional outdoor educator, guide, and wilderness medicine instructor. She holds a master's degree in outdoor education and spends most of her time hanging out with penguins and polar bears in the polar region. When she's not outdoors, you can find her traveling, reading Nietzsche, and drinking copious double espressos.


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